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Biden Executive Order: is minimum wage going up to 15$

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 Biden officials have asks an increase in the government's minimum wage to $ 15 an hour as part of their Covid emergency package. This increase is late - the government's minimum wage has not changed in more than 10 years since it rose to $ 7.25 in 2009. If you were to keep up with inflation, the minimum wage would be $ 11 an hour.

Currently, 29 states and the State of Columbia already have lower state wages than the federal $ 7.25.

Evidence suggests that lowering the minimum wage to $ 15 an hour could lift families out of poverty, reduce inequality in the labor market, and boost local economies. Raising the minimum wage will not solve all the problems faced by low-wage workers, but it is one of the necessary changes that can make the labor market more equitable.

Research suggests that the previous increase in low wages has played a key role in filling the racial income gap. Although very high wages can lead to job losses, studies, such as those from the Congressional Budget Office, predict that losses can be modest, especially when compared with the reduction of poverty.

Also, raising the minimum wage to $ 15 an hour will result in the loss of 1.4 million jobs, but will increase the wages of 27 million workers (including some earning just above the minimum wage) and lift 900,000 people out of poverty.

But low pay is just one problem for those employees. Low-wage jobs are less likely to provide employer benefits, such as health insurance, retirement plans, and paid leave. They come with greater safety and health risks than high-paying jobs. In addition, white people and women are more likely to hold low-wage jobs because of long-term inequality that deprives them of the opportunity to participate equally and reap the benefits of the American economy.

Dealing with this inequality will be in many ways. State, federal, and local governments need to consider new legislation and regulations that can address the mandate of employer benefits and employment standards and provide access to non-employment benefits. Additionally, voluntary efforts by employers to increase the quality of work can be assisted by clients, government contractors, and others who create employer benefits.

The disease has highlighted and exacerbated many of the challenges facing workers in low-paying jobs. Many low-wage workers - including food clerks, delivery workers, and meat handlers - are featured in Covid-19. In some cases, the availability of self-defense equipment or accident payment was inconsistent. And some low-paid employees who are sick or exposed to Covid-19 did not pay for self-care leave or health insurance to pay for testing.

In addition to dealing with severe exposure to coronavirus, many low-income workers are severely affected by disease closures, such as hospitality, and job losses. But many of these workers continue to fight for minimum wage increases and improve job quality. Restaurant staff members recommend a reduction in the minimum wage (employers are allowed to pay $ 2.13 to employees who receive advice) and increase the government's minimum wage to $ 15.

Increased attention to these problems during the epidemic has led to some changes if they are temporary. Some employers have provided certain services such as risky pay, overtime, and paid leave, for example. The provincial government's emergency response also extended paid leave to other employees affected by Covid-19. This can lead to a never-ending cycle of change.

Low-income labor problems existed even in the growing pre-epidemic economy and will continue in the post-vaccine economy. A low level of work quality is critical to improving the labor market for all workers, and that level contributes to the lowest wages

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